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I can count to POTATO!

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yagazieemezi:

ART FEATURE

AFRICAN ARTIST:

Ralph Ziman

Ziman, a South African street artist who now resides in Venice Beach, California, attacks Africa’s dominant gun culture with piercing colors and images that don’t fade from memory. With knitted masks and beaded weapons, Ziman paints Africa’s obsession with guns and the power they provide as so bizarre and overwhelming it’s nearly surreal. Both worshipped and feared, Ziman’s guns appear like dangerous totems from an unknown ritual, somewhat removed from the gun culture we’ve heard so much about. The vendors who star in Ziman’s photos were not at all directed in how to pose with the weapon replicas. Yet the viewer can sense the additional status pulsing through the subjects as they hold their powerful instruments, even if only for the duration of a photograph.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

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5582db:

Seungmo Park - Metal Wire Sculptures

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(Source: leathecat, via allmoviegifs)

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f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Pastel Icebergs by Zaria Forman

Zaria Forman perfectly masters drawing with pastels. Recently, the artist reveals works representing icebergs. An impressive record, discovered in a series of beautiful images.

(via failure-is-an-option)

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artchipel:

Curator’s Monday 137

Valerie Hegarty (USA)

Valerie Hegarty’s installations create dream-like transitional spaces and objects that expand and fracture the austerity of an exhibition space while dismantling the constructs of image- and object-making.  Informed by the current turbulent state of our country while also excavating from America’s past, Hegarty’s work often turns the gallery into a dramatic place of change.  Working with fragile materials such as foamcore, paper, paint and glue, she exploits a scrupulous mimicry of objects only to demolish them by devices often associated with their historical significance. On one level the viewer can become overwhelmed with an inquisitive desire to determine what is real and what is constructed and on another, can decide to revel in the make-believe. Hegarty’s ruins suggest a path of destruction and chaos that can be traced from early colonialism to the most recent effects of globalization. Her work portrays a pivotal moment in our narrative – one that is full of pathos yet buoyed by the hope that comes with change. (source: Fountainhead Residency) Our sincere thanks to arpeggia for this Curator’s Monday.

[more Valerie HegartyCurator’s Monday with arpeggia]

(via failure-is-an-option)

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tymurf:

instagram @ tymurf
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tymurf:

instagram @ tymurf

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